DENTAL
for your little ones

DENTAL
for your little ones

HOW CAN YOU TELL IF YOUR BABY IS TEETHING?

 

Many babies experience some discomfort during teething. Signs and symptoms of teething can include:
  • Frequent crying and crankiness
  • A mild fever
  • Reddened cheeks and drooling
  • Loss of or reduced appetite
  • Mild diarrhoea
  • Sucking or gnawing on toys
  • Pulling the ear on the same side as the erupting tooth

It is extremely important not to ignore symptoms such as fever and diarrhoea in your child. If these symptoms occur, seek medical advice.

HOW CAN YOU RELIEVE THE SYMPTOMS?

Signs and symptoms may appear and disappear over several days. Ask your dentist or pharmacist for advice before using any pain relief specifically created for babies and toddlers.
  • Wash your hands and gently rub your baby’s gums with a clean finger.
  • Give your baby a teething ring or wet washcloth to bite. Teething rings can be chilled in the refrigerator before being used to help manage discomfort associated with teething (do not put teething rings in the freezer)
  • Give your baby non-sweetened rusks to chew on

EATING FOR HEALTHY TEETH!

Did you know that as soon as your baby develops their first tooth, they are at risk of dental decay?  Diet plays an important role in the health of your child’s teeth, so developing healthy eating habits early in life will help your child form the building blocks for strong and healthy adult teeth:
  • If your baby has a breastfeed or bottle of milk before bed, gently wipe down their teeth with a moistened cloth before putting them to sleep
  • Don’t allow your child to take a bottle of milk or other sugary drinks to bed. When they are older, it is fine to place a glass of water on their bedside table in case they get thirsty overnight
  • If your baby needs to suck on something to settle them to sleep, offer a dummy rather than a bottle
  • Encourage your baby to learn to drink from a toddler cup from 12 months of age, as breast and bottle feeding regularly throughout the day or night once a child is over 12 months can contribute to dental decay.

 

WHAT FOODS CONTRIBUTE TO DENTAL DECAY?

Foods high in refined carbohydrates (sugar) feed the destructive bacteria in your baby’s or toddler’s mouth. The bacteria produce acid, which destroys your child’s teeth. Be sure to check the nutritional information panel on all packaged foods to help work out which foods and drinks have high carbohydrate and sugar levels.